Friday Fun: New Bell Music-More Than Enough

Today we are featuring the tender song by Shawna Edwards and her daughter Rebecca Edwards Woolf More Than Enough

Sheet music and recordings at ShawnaEdwardsMusic.com. Sung by members of the One Voice Children's Choir (onevoicechildrenschoir.com), directed by Masa Fukuda (@masa.fukuda). Soloists: Christy Higginson, Brynn Peterson, William Kim, Mackenzie Hess.

Shawna Edwards describes herself as a "full time wife and mother. Part-time songwriter. Disciple of Jesus Christ." These characteristics are evident in all of her compositions. More Than Enough shares the hopes and dreams, as well as the vulnerabilities, of being a parent or of any care-giver in the life of a child you love.

We are excited to share with you a free download of a new bell music arrangement just in time for Mother's Day. Feel free to shed sweet tears of remembrance and appreciation as we think about those who have loved and cared for us.

Check out her website https://shawnaedwardsmusic.com for the popular song The Miracle other moving Christian themes and music.

Lauren Denning
Thursday Thoughts: A Pattern In All Things-Create
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Part 4: The Finale

The previous blog posts commented on how the Circle of Fifths help you anticipate and appreciate what is happening in music, now on to our star--creation!

The most exciting reason to understand the chord patterns is it gives you the ability to create your own music. Understanding the patterns of music lays foundational skills to be able to create something new. 

There is no greater thrill than creating something out of nothing, especially knowing that this something has the potential to live forever. No personal trainer can even come close to touting those claims.

Doesn't the folk round go:

"All things must perish, Under the sky. 

Music alone shall live. 

Music alone shall live. 

Music alone shall live. Never to die."

It isn't just the immortality of music, that gives us such delight but it is the magic of music.

I used to think all music makers were magic. Their ability to connect with people without saying a word--magic.  

I really thought composers were especially magic. Even dead they never decompose. (Sorry! Bad joke.)

Magicians look like they are pulling a rabbit out of a hat, or a bird of out of a handkerchief, when in reality they just know visual tricks to make it appear to be so.

Musicians box of audio tricks is really just theory lessons put into an instrument. A hit song is 1% inspiration 99% patterned based musical math.

With the Chime In music and the Circle of Fifths it becomes clear to see that music is made up of artful patterns and patterns with a twist. 

Doesn't that make listening to music, making music, and writing music easier? 

Yes!

Yes, it does.

There really is a pattern in all things. 

The Chime In Circle of Fifths just helps those patterns to jump out. 

Remember: Music is created and communicates with chords!

Won't you Chime In?

Understanding the Circle of Fifths
Helps you anticipate, Appreciate,
and Eventually create music.
Lauren Denning
Thursday Thoughts: A Pattern In All Things-Appreciate
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Part 3: Recap to the Circle of Fifths

Every student's question--Why should I care?

Yes, knowing "Big Secret Number One" makes music reading (especially sight reading) so much easier, but after a while that spoonful-of-sugar kind of music makes you long for a deeper, richer salty (or sour or bitter) flavor. One that doesn't just give you a blood sugar spike but leaves you hungry, but one that has more dimensions, one that is more filling.

Dark chocolate caramels with sea salt anyone?

The human experience is broader than three happy chords. Imagine if a painter only ever used three colors? Wouldn't we all miss out on not being able to experience a masterpiece that uses color to employ perspective, shadowing, and mood--equaling greater depth and maturity? 

As wonderful as pink, orange, and blue are in any picture, the appropriate use of color heightens expression in the same way rage, shame or delight conveys a greater description than only anger, sadness or happiness would. Artists that go beyond the predictable are appreciated and revered.

Remember: Music colors feeling with chords! 

Understanding the Circle of Fifths
Helps you anticipate, Appreciate,
and Eventually create music.
Lauren Denning
Thursday Thoughts: A Pattern In All Things-Anticipate
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The Circle of Fifths: Part 2

Let's return to the big mac of the question--Why Should I Care?

Big secret number one: The majority of radio music is composed just out of three chords. 

Once you internalize that most of your left hand accompaniment is going to be made up of those three chord patterns, you can drop your "Good Boys Deserve Fudge Always" pneumonic device to figure out which note on the staff you should be playing, and instead narrow it down to which of three notes out of the chord.  (And if you don't get it right, it still will sound okay--hooray!) 

So which are those chords did you say? The major ones--I, IV, V. The sweet-as-sugar sunshine chords.

In the Key of C it would be:

I=C chord (C,E,G) 

IV=F chord (F,A,C)

V=G chord (G,B,D)

Remember: Music makes patterns through chords!

Understanding the Circle of Fifths
Helps you anticipate, Appreciate,
and Eventually create music.
Lauren Denning
Thursday Thoughts: A Pattern In All Things-Introduction
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seeing circles

 

Check out our user-friendly Circle of Fifths

The Circle of Fifths.

The black hole of music.

With the mere mention of it most students follow blank deer-in-the-headlights look, accompanied by spontaneous .

No longer.

The Chime In Circle of Fifths is different. 

It is friendly looking and inviting.

It is helpful.

It changes the way you look at music. 

It is suddenly oh-so-easy to see the patterns of music.

It is a music theory student's dream come true!

After proudly showing it off at a conference, someone actually dared to ask this honest question: Why should I care?

With years of teach behind my belt, I was ready to pounce. "Understanding the Circle of Fifths opens the door to understanding the framework of all music," I explained. Knowing the chord patterns in the Circle of Fifths helps you anticipate, appreciate, and eventually create.

Understanding the Circle of Fifths
Helps you anticipate, Appreciate,
and Eventually create music.
Lauren Denning